Dictionary of Common Guard-Related Dance Terms - How to color guard

I know we weren't all ballerinas in a past life, so I put together this list of common dance terms that we use in the color guard world to help refer to movements that are used both with and without equipment. They are also spelled correctly, apart from not having the ability to put accents over letters, as far as I know. Enjoy this list and let me know if there are any other dance terms you would like to see make it into the blog.

Arabesque - Standing on one leg with raised leg extended in straight line to rear and foot pointed.

Chasse - To chase. A moving dance step; one foot chases the other out of the way.

Fifth Position - With the arms, they are curved and high overhead; with the feet, they are turned out with one in front of the other, heel touching toe.

First Position - With the arms, they are curved and low in front of the body; with the

feet, the heels are together and they turn out to form at least a 90 degree angle.

Fourth Position - With the arms, they are curved with one arm high overhead and the

other arm low in front of the body; With the feet, they are turned out with one foot in front of the other with space between.

Grande Plie - To bend at the knees as low as you can possibly go. In first, third, fifth and fourth positions you will pick your heels up off of the ground, in second you will not.

Plie - To bend at the knees. Make sure your feet are turned out and your knees are over your toes while keeping your back straight.

Releve - To rise. In any position you rise onto your toes without rolling your ankles.

Saute - To jump off of both legs, extend the back leg and beat the front in the air, and land on the front leg.

Second Position - With the arms, the arms are parallel to the ground extending to both sides with a slight curve, shoulder above elbow above wrist above fingertips; with the legs, feet are shoulder-width or farther apart and turned out.

Third Position - With the arms, one arm is up high overhead while the other is extended to the side, both are curved; with the legs, the feet are heel to arch and turned out.

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